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At the recent Outdoor Retailer Summer Market show Esquif Canoes solidified its relationship with Northeast US industry veteran, Don Otey. "We feel very fortunate to be working with Don in the North eastern territory", says Sales Manager Nikki Rekman, "Don's reputation precedes him and together we expect great growth in the coming year. Esquif had a very successful 2007 season. The upcoming year is looking positive; the addition of Don to an already strong sales team gets us excited about what is in store for Esquif in 2008."
Arcata, CA - In September of 2007 the Expedition Amazonas team will trek and paddle, totally unsupported, for over 7 months and 7000km, the entire length of the mighty Amazon River.  This is a complete traverse of the South American continent from the Pacific Coast in Peru to the mouth of the Amazon River where it meets the Atlantic Ocean off Brazil.  The experienced expedition team includes members from Australia, South Africa and the United Kingdom.  Expedition Amazonas has partnered with environmental and indigenous rights action group Amazon Watch, and high-profile equipment sponsors including Kokatat, Teva and First Ascent.
Sunday, 09 September 2007

Tips to avoid an on water collision

This morning I came upon this article which shook me up. It seems that a body was found about two miles offshore from Rye in the English Channel. The kayaker's boat was found floating near by. The coastguard said that man's injuries and the damage to the canoe suggested he had been run down by a ship and killed. Over the past summer, there have been several different reports of large boats running over canoe, kayaks and small sail boats. Before, I could never understand how a paddler could get run over by a boat. I always figured that one could always move out of the way in time. My opinion of it changed this summer after hearing about a friend of the family whose little fishing boat was run over by a large powerboat. According to them, they were out fishing on a clear, calm day when they looked up just in time to see a large boat bearing down on them. They just had enough time to dive off the side of the boat before impact. They were fine but sadly the boat was quite damaged. It is schedule to go to court this fall. So, how can we keep ourselves from getting hit on the water? The first thing is to be vigilant on the water. Watch the other boaters and assume that they can't see you. To be honest, the majority probably can't. They are big so it is easy for you to see them but a canoe or kayak is barely three feet out of the water. When there are medium swells and you are in the trough of the wave, you are even lower in the water. Keep that in mind. Follow the rules of the road. Just because you are in a canoe or kayak doesn't mean that you need to follow the rules like everybody else. If possible, avoide the shipping channels since that is where the large boats are going to be. Consider a radar reflector.  There are several different commercial models on the market with various levels of success. Basically…
In late August 2007, Epicocity Project team members Howard "Trip" Jennings, Kyle Dickman, Brian Eustis, Matt Fields Johnson, Andy Maser, and Scott Feindell joined a team of scientists and cavers for a six week exploration of the Hargy Caldera in New Britain, Papua New Guinea. This National Geographic expedition will give voice to the recommendations of the United Nations Environmental Fund that this area be conserved.
Wednesday, 05 September 2007

Shark rescued by lifeguard

I saw this article on The Scotsman's website and couldn't help but post it: Shark rescued by lifeguard Sand Shark Photo by USGS © A LIFEGUARD at New York's Coney Island beach came to the rescue of a two-foot sand shark being attacked by frightened swimmers. Marisu Mironescu, 39, of Brooklyn, said he saw about 100 people circling the shark off Coney Island's beach. "Some were hitting him, smacking his face," said Miro-nescu. "I wasn't going to let them hurt the poor thing." He grabbed the largely harmless fish in his arms and carried it, backstroking out to sea, where he let it go. "Then he tried to bite me," said Mironescu.

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